Solved NTSC in PAL Region

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NTSC in PAL Region was created by phiwe

There is 24 25 50 fps in my region (pal) but i want to shoot a wedding in 30fps meaning i have to switch my DSLR from PAL to NTC so i ca access 30fps, Will the dvd play if i do so?
11 Feb 2017 02:37 #1

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Replied by DoctorZen on topic NTSC in PAL Region

Most DVD, Blu-ray players and TVs, will play discs from any region.

Why do you want to shoot 30fps in a PAL country ?
Do you realise this will cause BIG problems if you shoot inside, under any type of lighting ?
You will see bad powerline frequency flicker, due to 50 Hz power - even changing shutter speed will not work 100%.
Remember to turn everything off at least once a week, including your brain, then sit somewhere quiet and just chill out.
Unplugging is the best way to find solutions to your problems.
Peace :)
11 Feb 2017 02:52 #2

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Replied by phiwe on topic NTSC in PAL Region

I jus dont like the 24 fps look. Footage is jittery during panning. 30 fps wil be a bit smoother.

Judging from your answer i guess i have accept the setting i have in pal.
11 Feb 2017 06:27 #3

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Replied by ericlnz on topic NTSC in PAL Region

If, as you indicate, you have the choice of 24, 25 or 50 for PAL then shoot 50. Anything less will give close or fast sideways movement a non smooth, or slightly jerky, appearance. Although it depends on the viewer. Some find 25fps okay but I find it sometimes jerky.
11 Feb 2017 10:10 #4

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Replied by DoctorZen on topic NTSC in PAL Region

If, as you indicate, you have the choice of 24, 25 or 50 for PAL then shoot 50.


50 fps is not supported by the DVD format.

If however, you deliver the product to Blu-ray disc instead, you can burn a Blu-ray disc to 1280x720-50p.
50 fps on Blu-ray looks great on a modern TV screen.
Remember to turn everything off at least once a week, including your brain, then sit somewhere quiet and just chill out.
Unplugging is the best way to find solutions to your problems.
Peace :)
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11 Feb 2017 13:55 #5

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Replied by ericlnz on topic NTSC in PAL Region

Or export as 1080 50i.
11 Feb 2017 14:07 #6

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Replied by DoctorZen on topic NTSC in PAL Region

This is where it gets very confusing.

1080-50i is not 50 frames per second progressive.
1080-50i is 25 fps interlaced video.

Progressive style video is always superior to Interlaced video.
Interlaced video is a relic from cathode ray TV technology.
Remember to turn everything off at least once a week, including your brain, then sit somewhere quiet and just chill out.
Unplugging is the best way to find solutions to your problems.
Peace :)
11 Feb 2017 14:29 #7

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Replied by ericlnz on topic NTSC in PAL Region

Interlaced may be a relic from cathode ray technology but it is still used in TV transmissions and its part of the Blu-ray specs. My AVCHD video camera shoots 50i or 25p. I find 50i far superior to 25p. 25p with fast or close sideways motion is jerky even with my camera shutter set at 1/25. More modern cameras shoot 50p which is the ideal as it gives the best of both with full 50 frames , instead of 50 interlaced into 25, and fast framerate. But until I have a 50p camera I'm using 50i thanks. The only problem I've found with interlaced is that some modern 'budget priced' flat screen TVs do a terrible job with deinterlacing due to their cheap software. Fortunately even cheap Blu-ray players do a better job with deinterlacing and with upscaling od SD.

Slightly off topic what puzzles me is why digital at 25fps is so jerky when in 8mm film days we shot at 18, even 16 fps and movement wasn't jerky. True we had three bladed shutters but that was to get rid of flicker, it didn't increase the number of images per sec. I've never found a satisfactory explanation so assume it's due to the different nature of film and digital. Film has grain 'pixels' which are constantly moving around whereas digital has pixels which are in a fixed position. At least that's my theory until someone comes up with a better explanation.
11 Feb 2017 18:42 #8

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Replied by phiwe on topic NTSC in PAL Region

DoctorZen wrote:

If, as you indicate, you have the choice of 24, 25 or 50 for PAL then shoot 50.


50 fps is not supported by the DVD format.

If however, you deliver the product to Blu-ray disc instead, you can burn a Blu-ray disc to 1280x720-50p.
50 fps on Blu-ray looks great on a modern TV screen.


50p is out then as its notdvd compartible. I guess i will stick with 24p or 30p would be better option if NTC recording does not give any problems.
12 Feb 2017 00:06 #9

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Replied by Eagle Six on topic NTSC in PAL Region

Hi phiwe,

I've used motion blur, with various results, some good, some bad, to reduce the jitters! If you are using Vegas Pro, there is a feature 'Motion Blur'. In Movie Studio an option would be the FX 'Linear Blur'. I'm not sure if this option is worth you trying, but it may offer enough improvement to be satisfactory, or not! A little goes a long way using the Motion Blur or FX Linear Blur. All you needs is a little to smooth out the lack of additional frames.

Again, the success or failure is based on the source media movement and your likes or dislikes. The idea is to trick our eyes into missing the sharp defined edges of one frame moving to the next, which may hide the large difference in movement from one frame to the other, and then appear to blend the frames together for a smoother transition between frames. I don't care for this option, but it could work for you.

The best method is to avoid fast pans and long pans. The slower the frame speed, the slower the pan speed. The less pans, generally the better production. At least that works best for me.

Good Luck on your wedding photography. You are very wise to search out your issues before the show, because as we very well know, weddings are those type events there is no going back for re-shoots.
Best Regards......George
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12 Feb 2017 04:50 #10

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